Can Metronidazole Cause Early Period

An early period here and there usually isn’t cause for concern. Everyone’s menstrual cycle is different. Your cycle starts on the first day of your current period and ends on the first day of your next period. A typical cycle lasts anywhere from 21 to 39 days, so the number of days spent bleeding varies from person to person. Most people bleed for two to seven days. If your cycle is frequently shorter than 21 days, leading you to bleed earlier than you normally do, it could be a sign of something underlying.

A range of factors can cause a period to be early. If this happens every once in a while, it is likely no cause for concern, as variations in the menstrual cycle are common. Early periods often result from hormonal changes, especially during puberty and perimenopause. Many underlying medical conditions can also cause menstrual irregularities.

What is Metronidazole?

Metronidazole is in a class of medications called nitroimidazole antimicrobials. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Metronidazole capsules and tablets are used to treat infections of the reproductive system, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, skin, heart, bone, joint, lung, blood, nervous system, and other areas of the body.

Metronidazole capsules and tablets are also used to treat sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Metronidazole extended-release (long-acting) tablets are used to treat bacterial vaginosis (an infection caused by too much of certain types of harmful bacteria in the vagina) in women.

Metronidazole injection is used to treat certain skin, blood, bone, joint, gynecologic, and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria. It is also used to treat endocarditis (infection of the heart lining and valves), meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord), and certain respiratory infections, including pneumonia. Metronidazole injection is also to prevent infection when used before, during, and after colorectal surgery.

 

Can metronidazole throw off your period?

Despite anecdotal evidence flying all over the internet that metronidazole can throw off your period , there’s actually no scientific evidence to back this up. In fact, scientific studies have shown that antibiotics don’t cause a delay or change to your period. Read: How Drug Use Affect Period In Women

 

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • buzzing, ringing, or whistling sound heard in the ears
  • change in taste sensation
  • coated or furry tongue
  • darker urine
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness or lightheadedness
  • headache
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea
  • sleepiness
  • stomach pain or cramps
  • unpleasant or sharp metallic taste
  • vomiting

Although most of the side effects listed below don’t happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • any vaginal irritation, discharge, or dryness not present before use of this medicine
  • confusion
  • eye pain
  • fever or unexpected infections
  • hallucinations
  • hearing loss
  • mouth ulcers
  • numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in hands or feet
  • signs of depression (e.g., poor concentration, changes in weight, changes in sleep, decreased interest in activities, thoughts of suicide)
  • skin rash, redness, or itching
  • vision changes

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • convulsions (seizures)
  • difficulty coordinating body movement
  • extreme sensitivity to bright light
  • severe watery or bloody diarrhea
  • signs of pancreatitis (e.g., abdominal pain on the upper left side, back pain, nausea, fever, chills, rapid heartbeat, swollen abdomen)
  • signs of a serious allergic reaction (e.g., difficulty breathing, itchy skin rash, swelling of face or throat, wheezing)
  • signs of a severe skin reaction such as blistering, peeling, a rash covering a large area of the body, a rash that spreads quickly, or a rash combined with fever or discomfort
  • signs of liver problems (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, dark urine, pale stools)
  • stiff neck along with a headache

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

 

SHARE THIS:
error: Protected Content!!