Can I Get Pregnant If Sperm Touches The Outside

According to the Family Planning Association (FPA) in the UK, up to 90 percent of sexually active women will become pregnant in 12 months if they do not use contraception. A person risks becoming pregnant every time they have sex without contraception, including the first time they ever have sex.

Pregnancy happens when a man’s sperm fertilizes a woman’s egg, which can happen even if you’ve not had sexual intercourse (penetration). During sex, semen is ejaculated from the man’s penis into the woman’s vagina. A man’s semen (the liquid produced when he ejaculates or “comes”) contains millions of sperm. One ejaculation can contain more than 300 million sperm.

As soon as the penis is erect, before the man ejaculates, a liquid called pre-ejaculate is produced. This liquid can contain thousands of sperm. Men have no control over the production of this liquid.

A woman’s ovaries release one or more eggs (ovulation) 12-16 days before her next period. The man’s sperm enters the woman’s body through her vagina, then travels through her cervix and womb to the fallopian tubes, where an egg is fertilized (conception). The egg can be fertilized by sperm contained in semen or pre-ejaculate.

 

Can I Get Pregnant If Sperm Touches The Outside

It’s possible for you to get pregnant without having sexual intercourse if, for example:

  • sperm get into your vagina – for example, if you or your partner have semen or pre-ejaculate on your fingers and touch your vagina

 

  • your partner ejaculates near your vagina

 

  • your partner’s erect penis comes into contact with your body near your vagina

The risk of getting pregnant in this way is very low because sperm can only live for a short time outside of the body. But fingering can also cause pregnancy IF there’s semen on the hand that’s touching the vulva However, if you’re not planning a pregnancy, it’s important to know that it’s possible to get pregnant in this way.

 

How to Prevent Pregnancy after Unprotected Sex

 

Emergency contraceptive

Take an emergency contraceptive pill (AKA the morning-after pill like Postinor 2 or Postpill) within 120 hours (5 days) after having unprotected sex.

You can use emergency contraception to prevent pregnancy if:

 

  • you didn’t use a condom or other birth control method when you had vaginal sex

 

  • you messed up your regular birth control (forgot to take your birth control pills, change your patch or ring, or get your shot on time) and had vaginal sex

 

  • your condom broke or slipped off after ejaculation (cumming)

 

  • your partner didn’t pull out in time

 

  • you were forced to have unprotected vaginal sex

 

If you use emergency contraception correctly after you have unprotected sex, it makes it much less likely that you’ll get pregnant. But don’t use it regularly as your only protection from pregnancy, because it’s not as effective as regular, non-emergency birth control methods.

 

Condoms

Condoms can protect against STIs as well as pregnancy.Male and female condoms are the only types of contraception that protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). When used correctly, male condoms are more than 80 percent effective against pregnancy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

To use a male condom correctly:

  1. Choose the correct size.
  2. Place the condom on the head of the erect penis. If uncircumcised, pull the foreskin back first.
  3. Pinch the tip of the condom to remove any air.
  4. Unroll the condom down the penis, being careful not to tear it.
  5. After intercourse, hold the base of the condom in place before pulling out of the vagina.
  6. Remove the condom and dispose of it. Never reuse a condom.

Most male condoms are made of latex, but other types are available for those with a latex allergy. If using a lubricant, check that it is compatible with the kind of condom being used. For example, latex condoms can only be used with water-based lube. Condoms are available over-the-counter (OTC), without a prescription, from supermarkets, drugstores, or online. Latex-free condoms are also available to buy online.

 

Female condoms

Female condoms are also available without a prescription. They can be used instead of a male condom, but should never be used with one. According to the CDC, female condoms are about 79 percent effective for contraception.

Many drugstores now sell female condoms, but if local stores do not stock them, they are available online.

 

Diaphragm

A diaphragm is a barrier method of contraception that a person places inside the vagina. It is important to apply spermicide to the diaphragm before each use. When used with spermicide, the CDC estimate that the diaphragm is close to 90 percent effective.

A person must insert the diaphragm a few hours before intercourse, leave it in place for 6 hours after sex, and remove it after 24 hours. Diaphragms do not protect against STIs.

 

Spermicide

Spermicide is a chemical that inactivates sperm. It is available to buy without a prescription and is used with forms of barrier contraception, such as condoms, but not with the sponge.

If used alone, spermicide should be inserted close to the cervix at least 10 minutes before sex. It remains effective for 60 minutes and is approximately 71 percent effective. Spermicide gels can be found at drugstores or purchased online. Talk to a doctor about the most effective ways to use spermicide as a contraceptive. SEE: Pills to Take After Sex To Prevent Unwanted Pregnancy

SHARE THIS: